Command Line Basics: Ripping Audio CD’s, Part 2

September 11, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: command line, HowTo, linux, Ubuntu 

In Part 1 of CLB: Ripping Audio CD's, I showed how to rip the audio from a CD and save it as WAV files using cdparanoia. In today's short tutorial I'll show how to convert those WAV files to Ogg Vorbis audio files.

So the first thing we'll need to do is make sure that the proper tools are installed. We're going to use the oggenc command which is part of the vorbis-tools package. You can check your distro's repositories for vorbis-tools. If you're using Ubuntu, you can install it with: Read more

Command Line Basics: Ripping Audio CD’s, Part 1

September 5, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: command line, HowTo, linux, Ubuntu 

There are many GUI based CD rippers available for the Linux desktop. While many of these applications do a great job of ripping, I like to understand the underlying technology. For that reason, I decided to figure out how to rip CD's from the command line.

Read more

Command Line Basics: Create Text Files With tee

June 20, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: command line, HowTo, linux 

The Linux tee command is a way to write the standard output to a file. Or, to quote from the man page documentation,

tee - read from standard input and write to standard output and files

This is a little different from redirecting output to a file. Read more

Command Line Basics: View Text With less

April 21, 2010 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: command line, HowTo, linux 

I've shown previously how to use the more command to view text output. Today I'll show how to do the same thing with the less command. You can run the command simply by opening a  terminal window and entering less followed by the file name. For example:  Read more

Command Line Basics: List Hard Drives By UUID

March 26, 2010 by · 6 Comments
Filed under: command line, HowTo, linux 

Recent versions of Linux use a unique identifier for hard drives in order to make sure they get mounted to the same location all the time. If you've looked into your /etc/fstab file for auto mounting drives, then you're probably already familiar with the long character strings that are used for UUID's.

The question is, how do I find out the UUID for each drive on my computer? Well, there's more than one way to do this, but the simplest is probably the blkid command. Read more

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